Climate change
affects us all today

The day after Typhoon Bopha raged through the southern Philippines island of Mindanao. Photo: ACT Alliance/Paul Jeffrey

But we can
deal with it

Women are building new houses in flooded area nearby the river Brahmaputra in Bangladesh. Photo: Norwegian Church Aid/Jens Aas-Hansen

And fight poverty
at the same time

Woman trained as engineer installing new solar panels in Timbuktu, Mali. Photo: Greg Rødland Buick/Norwegian Church Aid

Send a message to
world leaders

Popular protest in the streets of Bangkok calling for international action on climate. Photo: Christian Aid/Amanda Farrant

Act Now for
Climate Justice

Archbishop Desmond Tutu have just handed over 500 000 signatures demanding climate justice. Photo: Dan Church Aid/Peter Williams

slide 1 We have great challenges in the world today: Global poverty and climate change… They can be overcome.

slide 2 The wealthiest countries of the world are most responsible for climate change. Yet it is the world’s poorest people who are suffering the worst from its effects. Now, poor people not only have to fight poverty, but climate change as well. This is not fair.

slide 3 The effects of climate change are already being felt. People all over the world experience heavier floods, more severe droughts, more violent storms, and rising sea levels. People’s drinking water is being polluted, and their farming fields are being destroyed. However, if we act now, we can still deal with the worst effects of climate […]

slide 4 The effects of climate change are already being felt. People all over the world experience heavier floods, more severe droughts, more violent storms, and rising sea levels. People's drinking water is being polluted, and their farming fields are being destroyed. However, if we act now, we can still deal with the worst effects of climate change.

slide 5 We demand world leaders deliver climate justice through fair and strong climate actions that will (1) keep global warming well below a 2 degrees celsius temperature rise, and (2) scale up public finance so the poorest can adapt to climate change and continue to develop in a climate-friendly way.

CLIMATE WITNESSES

Over the past few years we have encountered people from around the world who are experiencing the dramatic effects of climate change first hand -- from children in Tanzania to farmers in the Philippines to working mothers in El Salvador. Meet the Climate Witnesses.

Click on the photos below to read climate witness stories.


Support us in spreading the word!

We need all hands on deck to solve the climate crisis, and you can help by inviting friends and family to join the campaign for climate justice. Simply click the buttons below to share to your favorite social networks.

aldiouma-karambe

Aldiouma Karambe

Aldiouma Karambe

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Aldiouma Karambe, 60, lives in a village in the Dogon Plateau, an arid area in central Mali. The land is covered in rocky outcrops and has little cultivatable soil. Growing crops on the Dogon Plateau is difficult at the best of times. Now the effects of climate change are making it even harder. The rainy season has become less predictable, leaving communities to cope with both droughts and flooding, causing soil erosion and land degradation.

Aldiouma is one of the leaders of the anti-erosion committee in his village, which was set up by Christian Aid partner APH (Action pour la Promotion Humaine) to help the community adapt to the changing climate.

Because of the rocky nature of the land in the Dogon Plateau, when it does rain the water tends to run off the stony surfaces, taking the precious topsoil with it. To prevent this one of the things Aldiouma oversees in his role on the committee is the creation of stone lines and walls – known as diguettes or bunds. Built from stones that are found naturally across the Sahel, these walls help to retain water in the soil and also protect the fields from high winds. Aldiouma received training from APH and in turn trains men and women in the village to make the walls, advising on different types of wall for particular needs.

He says: “I have seen many changes in the climate. In 2007 we had very bad floods. When I was a child it rained more often. There were so many trees and bushes that it was hard to get through – now there are almost none. There used to be high grasses for the animals. Now we don’t have as much rain and the animals have less feed. There are now many more people, making new fields and putting more pressure on our resources. We used to enclose the fields with branches, leaves and mud. But they would wash away if there was heavy rain. We find the walls work much better. There is better humidity in the soil. When it rains it helps us to have a better harvest.”

Photo Credit: Christian Aid / Lilly Peel

Vivian-Berroteran-Rodriguez

Vivian Berroterán Rodríguez

Vivian Berroterán Rodríguez

Vivian-Berroteran-Rodriguez-med

“There are lots of hurricanes here, two or three times a year. We lose our harvests and sometimes people die. They’re more powerful than they used to be. When I was little there were fewer hurricanes.”

Credit: Christian Aid

Martha-Balderama

Martha Balderama

Martha Balderama

Martha-Balderama-med

‘Things have changed. It is summer now but it’s raining. It’s meant to be dry. In the past the heat was bearable but now it’s much hotter. When the weather ruins the crops I have to replant. It costs time and money,’ says 72 year-old Martha Balderama.

With support from Christian Aid’s local partner Rice Watch Action Network (RWAN), farmers in the Philippines are learning about climate change, organic farming, and the benefits of regular seasonal and localised 10 day weather forecasts. Farmers like Martha attend a 16 week field school, applying what they learn on a working ‘demonstration’ farm.

Thanks to the project, farmers have seen a reduction in costs, improved harvests and increased incomes. Ultimately, by adapting their ways, vulnerable famers are becoming more resilient in the face of climate change.

Photo Credit: Christian Aid / Ross Hemingway

Jesus-Chus-Echavarria

Jesus ‘Chus’ Echavarria

Jesus ‘Chus’ Echavarria

Jesus-Chus-Echavarria

The tropical depression which swept through El Salvador in October 2011 flooded Chus’s house, and the family was forced to stay in an emergency shelter. Here’s what he said about climate change.

“There have always been floods here, but now they’re worse. In recent years the rains have increased and the banks of the river can’t cope, so it becomes far more dangerous for people and our animals. In a community like this we are more affected because we are so vulnerable, and our vulnerability is even increasing”.

Credit: Christian Aid

Martha-Balderama

Martha Balderama

Martha Balderama

Martha-Balderama-med

‘Things have changed. It is summer now but it’s raining. It’s meant to be dry. In the past the heat was bearable but now it’s much hotter. When the weather ruins the crops I have to replant. It costs time and money,’ says 72 year-old Martha Balderama.

With support from Christian Aid’s local partner Rice Watch Action Network (RWAN), farmers in the Philippines are learning about climate change, organic farming, and the benefits of regular seasonal and localised 10 day weather forecasts. Farmers like Martha attend a 16 week field school, applying what they learn on a working ‘demonstration’ farm.

Thanks to the project, farmers have seen a reduction in costs, improved harvests and increased incomes. Ultimately, by adapting their ways, vulnerable famers are becoming more resilient in the face of climate change.

Photo Credit: Christian Aid / Ross Hemingway

aldiouma-karambe

Aldiouma Karambe

Aldiouma Karambe

aldiouma-karambe-med

Aldiouma Karambe, 60, lives in a village in the Dogon Plateau, an arid area in central Mali. The land is covered in rocky outcrops and has little cultivatable soil. Growing crops on the Dogon Plateau is difficult at the best of times. Now the effects of climate change are making it even harder. The rainy season has become less predictable, leaving communities to cope with both droughts and flooding, causing soil erosion and land degradation.

Aldiouma is one of the leaders of the anti-erosion committee in his village, which was set up by Christian Aid partner APH (Action pour la Promotion Humaine) to help the community adapt to the changing climate.

Because of the rocky nature of the land in the Dogon Plateau, when it does rain the water tends to run off the stony surfaces, taking the precious topsoil with it. To prevent this one of the things Aldiouma oversees in his role on the committee is the creation of stone lines and walls – known as diguettes or bunds. Built from stones that are found naturally across the Sahel, these walls help to retain water in the soil and also protect the fields from high winds. Aldiouma received training from APH and in turn trains men and women in the village to make the walls, advising on different types of wall for particular needs.

He says: “I have seen many changes in the climate. In 2007 we had very bad floods. When I was a child it rained more often. There were so many trees and bushes that it was hard to get through – now there are almost none. There used to be high grasses for the animals. Now we don’t have as much rain and the animals have less feed. There are now many more people, making new fields and putting more pressure on our resources. We used to enclose the fields with branches, leaves and mud. But they would wash away if there was heavy rain. We find the walls work much better. There is better humidity in the soil. When it rains it helps us to have a better harvest.”

Photo Credit: Christian Aid / Lilly Peel

KarineVanBroeke

The Rev Karine Van Broeke, President of the Synod of the PKN

The Rev Karine Van Broeke, President of the Synod of the PKN

“Climate change is about justice, justice to the earth and all the creatures living on it.”

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THE CLIMATE LEADERBOARD

Welcome to our leaderboard of champions -- people from around the world helping to protect the climate by recruiting friends and family to join the campaign and take action on climate change.

Top-ranking advocates may be invited to join VIP missions or attend exclusive events. See the Top 100.

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